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“The Best Album Otis Redding Never Made”

2 Mar

otis

I have always loved the voice of Otis Redding. Who doesn’t, right? So much soul and feeling. So raspy and unique. More of a song stylist than a true singer. He could scream and shout with the best of ‘em, but his talents were perhaps best on display when he performed a slower ballad. That is especially true when the ballad tackled the topics of pain, loneliness, heartbreak or sorrow.

The cover looks like an old, time-worn LP cover. The cover art fits within the time period. Yet this is a completely new collection being released for the first time. Cool concept — and it works. The album is a mix of the familiar and the unfamiliar. The original songs and a few alternate versions. Some Redding penned originals and compositions by the likes of Eddie Floyd and Lloyd Price.

Most all the cuts here click. Those that don’t on all levels still demand your attention and curiousity. An example of the latter would be the alternate take of “I’ve Got Dreams To Remember.” There are a few awkward key changes that can be hard on the ear, but the feeling and emotion is still very much there. The backing band (Steve Cropper, Booker T and the boys) seems to be experimenting — trying to find their way at times on this take. I’m guessing that is why this version is subtitled “Rougher Dreams.” You can understand why this rougher take didn’t make the original record back in the late 60’s.  

On the other hand, the alternate version of “Open the Door” is simply killer stuff. Subtitled “Skeleton Key Version,” this one delivers the goods in the best Redding tradition. The 2:29 slow burn comes complete with door knocks and goosebump-inducing blasts from the mighty Memphis Horns and Booker T’s Hammond B-3. The collection closes with the hopeful “My Lover’s Prayer” — long one of my favorite Redding performances. It leaves you wanting more, so don’t forget to punch that REPEAT button. This makes for ideal late night listening.  

Turn the lights down and the volume up.

You’ll find plenty to like about this new addition to Otis’ legendary catalog.

LOS ANGELES, Calif. — Otis Redding’s Lonely & Blue: The Deepest Soul of Otis Redding could pass for a title Stax/Volt might have released in the late ’60s. The look of the album reflects Stax’s design themes of the era. But in fact it’s a collection that never existed, until now, that homes in on one mood and one theme —heartbreaking, yearning ballads — of which Redding had many. The album will be released as a CD and blue vinyl LP on March 5, 2013 on Stax Records through Concord Music Group.

Lonely & Blue: The Deepest Soul of Otis Redding contains the hits (“I’ve Been Loving You Too Long,” “These Arms of Mine,” “My Lover’s Prayer,” “Free Me”) alongside many lesser-known songs (“Gone Again,” “Open the Door,” “Waste of Time,” “Everybody Makes a Mistake,” to name a few). They’re all included in this compilation because they share the tangled theme of sorrow.

According to compilation producer David Gorman, “Given how nobody delivered a gut-wrenching sad song like Otis, I always felt he should have made an album you could put on late at night and settle into with a glass of something strong. The mood and the subject of every song is the same — Otis, heartbroken, and begging for love. I tried to find the saddest most potently heartbreaking songs he ever sang, with no regard for chart position or notoriety. There are a few hits on the album, but they’re there because they fit the mood, not because we wanted to include the hits.”

For instance, an alternate version of “I’ve Got Dreams To Remember” features lyrics that are darker and tell a more personal story than the better-known hit version. Little-known tracks like “Gone Again” and “A Waste of Time” are given the same weight as “I’ve Been Loving You too Long.” The motif of love is even subtly addressed in the sequencing, the album closing with “Send Me Some Lovin’” and “My Lover’s Prayer.”

The concept of Lonely & Blue: The Deepest Soul of Otis Redding plays out in the packaging as well, which was intentionally designed by Gorman to look as if Redding actually did put this album out at the height of his career. The typography, color palette, and layout are all meant to adhere to the Stax/Volt LP designs of the time. This extends to the liner notes, which are written in the present tense and credited to a fictitious DJ so that they read as if they were written while Redding was alive at his peak.

“The goal,” explains Gorman, “was to create the best album Otis never made and ‘reissue’ it in 2013 rather than do another hits compilation. We hope this album will reframe him as something more than an oldies radio staple and become his Night Beat (a classic 1963 Sam Cooke LP) — the album that exists as a starting point for people wondering why so many consider Otis Redding the greatest soul singer of all time.”

Track Listing:
1. I Love You More Than Words Can Say
2. Gone Again
3. Free Me
4. Open the Door [Skeleton Key Version]
5. A Waste of Time
6. These Arms of Mine
7. I’ve Been Loving You Too Long (To Stop Now)
8. Everybody Makes a Mistake
9. Little Ol’ Me
10. I’ve Got Dreams to Remember [Rougher Dreams]
11. Send Me Some Lovin’
12. My Lover’s Prayer

A Weekday Lunch at Sprayberry’s BBQ in Newnan, Georgia

2 Feb

sb menu cover

Sprayberry’s is a longtime stalwart of Southern BBQ. They have been around since 1926, so staying power is one of their strong suits. Country music star Alan Jackson once waited tables at Sprayberry’s. There are 2 locations now (both in Newnan, GA). We hit the Jackson Street location several years back and enjoyed it. This time we were traveling from Atlanta back to Mobile, Alabama and our timing was just right. We arrived just before noon — beating the lunch rush.  

sb lg

We were promptly seated in the spacious dining room and handed large tan menus (see the 2 images above). I immediately noticed the Lewis Grizzard Special (details shown on photo above). The late Grizzard was a popular Southern humorist who is still something of a folk hero in these parts. I owned a couple of his comedy tapes and sometimes read his column in the Atlanta Journal Constitution. He was a funny man with a hearty appetite for Dixie-style chow, so this BBQ combo is a fitting tribute.

sb plate

I wasn’t feeling up to onion rings, so I ordered the Chopped Pork Sandwich with a side of Brunswick Stew and a Sweet Tea with Lemon. My sandwich came with fresh chopped slaw (lacking the usual heavy mayo), a few pickle slices, and a small cup of Sprayberry’s singular BBQ sauce. It’s kind of a thin, vinegar-based condiment — not too different than sauces you find in Eastern North Carolina. The sandwich was quite tasty — lean, smokey swine paired with crunchy grated cabbage and the peppery tang of the sauce.

sb stew

I consider myself a bit of a Brunswick Stew aficionado, so I braced myself to be disappointed when I first viewed Sprayberry’s mushy concoction (see above). Virginians and Georgians have long debated about which state bubbled up the very first Brunswick Stew. I am not here to argue that point at this time. I will say that I am more accustomed to a stew with more texture. Kernals of sweet yellow corn, visible strands of meat (most often chicken), tiny green butter beans, etc. Sprayberry’s Stew looks more like baby food, but I am pleased to report that it is suitably flavorful. I added just a sprinkle of salt and a tiny splash of Tabasco. You could drink this stuff through a straw. I elected to utilize the more traditional spoon.

Sprayberry’s has stood the test of time for a reason. The food is good. The pricing fair. The service swift. Convenient access from the interstate. All in all a positive Dixie Dining experience. So if you find yourself motoring between Auburn, Alabama and Atlanta, Georgia, please do give ‘em a try. It’s right on the beaten path, but worthy of your time and palate even if it was not. Skip the fast food options and treat yourself to a taste of Georgia culinary history.

sb postcard

Sprayberry’s BBQ –

Hwy. 34 @ I-85, Newnan, GA (770) 253-5080

229 Jackson Street, Newnan, GA (770) 253-4421

www.sprayberrysbbq.com

For more reviews of Southern food, please visit our web site at www.DixieDining.com

Nashville’s Triple Threat Jerry Reed Enjoys New Life Thanks to Real Gone Music

26 May

JERRY REED

The Unbelievable Guitar & Voice of Jerry Reed

Nashville Underground

OK, folks. Let me begin by stating that this CD does not contain the radio hits “Amos Moses,’ “When You’re Hot You’re Hot,” “Ko-Ko Joe,” or “East Bound and Down.” So does this mean should immediately dismiss the new Jerry Reed release from Real Gone Music? Nope. Check that. Make it “Hell no!” Jerry Reed Hubbard was one talented cat, y’all. Master guitar picker. Cracker Jack sense of humor. Accomplished song writer. Starred in a few movies too (who can forget him as Burt Reynold’s sidekick in “Smokey and the Bandit”?).

Real Gone’s new CD covers 2 early Reed efforts (1967 & 1968) on the RCA label. RCA was riding high during those times – thanks in good measure to the production skills of legendary Chet Atkins and all the talented musicians and tunesmiths who called Nashville’s fabled RCA Studio B home. Reed spent some valuable time in that stable, but it soon became evident that this Georgia native had major star power.

Check out “Guitar Man” — you’ll dig it. Elvis did too. The King recorded it and it became a sizeable hit. Presley also tackled “U.S. Male,” another rockin’ track appearing on the original issue of “The Unbelievable Guitar and Voice of Jerry Reed.” Sure, a pretty wordy album title. But you must keep in mind that Jerry Reed was not exactly a man of few words. In fact, some of his recordings might even be called “Redneck Rap.” The old boy had a way with the King’s English, that’s for certain.

Reed’s nimble fingers get a 1:59 workout on his signature instrumental piece, “The Claw.” “Love Man” spotlight’s his undeniable Dixie-fried bravado, while a few Nashville Underground tracks like “A Thing Called Love” showcase Jerry’s softer side and actually tug at the heartstrings. Reed’s voice tended to take on a deeper tone when delivering this type of sentimental material. The song’s a keeper … as are cuts like “Fine on my Mind” and the raucous “Tupelo Mississippi Flash.” The latter tune is a fine example of Jerry Reed’s trademark sense of humor and gift of gab. Have a listen to this disc, hoss. We think it will, as Jerry used to say, “knock your hat in the creek.”

Two classic, late-‘60s albums from Jerry Reed, both of them never on CD before! The titles to these two records (his first two) really tell the tale; Jerry was an unbelievable guitarist and singer, and you can add songwriter to the list—at least Elvis thought so, as he covered both “Guitar Man” and “U.S. Male” from Unbelievable (and hired Jerry to play guitar on both)! Jerry returned the favor by writing an Elvis tribute song (“Tupelo Mississippi Flash”) on 1968’s Nashville Underground, which lives up to its title by presenting a revelatory blend of country, rock ‘n’ roll, folk, blue-eyed soul and even progressive pop.

Though Reed was a protégé of Chet Atkins, his eclectic taste and irrepressible personality—later on full display in the Smokey and the Bandit films—ensured that this record busted out of the countrypolitan mold that held sway in Nashville at the time. Both of these albums are must-listens for any alt-country and roots music fan, and Chris Morris contributes notes that place these two albums in context of Jerry’s incredible (and, to this day, underappreciated) career.

Featured Songs:

It Don’t Work That Way

Guitar Man

You’re Young and You’ll Forget

Woman Shy

I Feel for You

Take a Walk

Love Man

If I Promise

U.S. Male

Long Gone

If It Comes to That

The Claw

Remembering

A Thing Called Love

You Wouldn’t Know a Good Thing

Save Your Dreams

Almost Crazy

You’ve Been Cryin’ Again

Fine on My Mind

Tupelo Mississippi Flash

Wabash Cannonball

Hallelujah, I Love Her So

John Henry

Available May 29, 2012 Pre-Order Now!

Concord Re-Issues “Here’s Little Richard” with Bonus Tracks/Features

7 Apr

Little Richard was an electrifying talent — that we can all agree upon. But where exactly does he stand among contemporaries like Elvis, Jerry Lee Lewis, Buddy Holly and Chuck Berry? Richard, like the other performers mentioned, was an early inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. But his legacy has not aged as well as many of his fellow rock giants. Richard did not always have access to the best material. His career quickly stalled out when he announced he would no longer sing “the devil’s music.” Yet, at the top of his game, the man born Richard Penniman could really stir up a room.

Top notch songs like Tutti Frutti, Ready Teddy, Long Tall Sally, Slippin and Slidin, and Rip It Up have surely stood the test of time. Penniman’s producer Art Rupe deserves a great deal of credit — as does the marvelous crew of backing musicians that can be heard on Richard’s New Orleans and Los Angeles recording sessions. These often overlooked studio cats included names like Lee Allen on tenor sax, Huey Smith on piano, Alvin “Red” Tyler on baritone sax, and the legendary Earl Palmer on drums.

Most of the highlights of Little Richard’s early rock n’ roll career can be found on “Here’s Little Richard.” Of special note is the bonus audio interview  with Rupe, Richard’s two original demo recordings, and included videos of Penniman’s 1956 Hollywood screen tests. The videos show Little Richard powering his way thru Tutti Frutti and Long Tall Sally. These songs heavily influenced acts like The Beatles and still maintain their energy and excitement more than 50 years after first being transferred to vinyl. The packaging also comes with a tastefully done booklet, some very cool B&W photography, and a fold-out poster of the original album cover. How’s that for extras???

Collectors and longtime fans will really dig the extra features and enhanced sound quality. If you don’t have any Little Richard in your collection, this is a wonderful place to start. Pop it into your CD player and you’ll be “ripping it up” in no time flat. Little Richard had that effect on people — and he still does today.

Rock ’n’ roll may date back to Jackie Brenston’s “Rocket 88” in 1951 and perhaps further to blues/swing hybrids of the 1940s. But many would contend that Little Richard’s “Tutti Frutti,” recorded at Cosimo Matassa’s studio in New Orleans in September 1955, was the first great rock ’n’ roll record. “Tutti Frutti” kicks off Here’s Little Richard, Concord Music Group’s expanded reissue of the original Specialty Records album from 1957. Street date is April 17, 2012.
In addition to the original recordings of Little Richard’s best known hits — “Long Tall Sally,” “Ready Teddy,” “Jenny Jenny,” “Rip It Up,” “Slippin’ and Slidin’” and more — the Concord remastered reissue features two bonus tracks (Specialty demo recordings of “Baby” and “All Night Long”) and two videos (screen tests of “Tutti Frutti” and “Long Tall Sally”).

The set contains liner notes by R&B musicologist Lee Hildebrand, as well as the notes from the original LP. Although Little Richard recorded for RCA Victor in 1951 and Peacock Records in 1953, his Specialty years — the 25-month period between September 1955 and October 1957 — proved monumental. As annotator Hildebrand writes, “They are quite possibly the most exciting and incendiary recordings in the annals of popular music and constitute a body of work upon which Richard’s reputation as one of the primary architects of rock ’n’ roll is measured.” Richard approached Specialty Records at the suggestion of R&B legend Lloyd Price, best known for the 1952 R&B hit “Lawdy Miss Clawdy.”

Richard and his band, the Upsetters, recorded a demo of two blues songs at Macon radio station WMBL-AM. The first, “Baby,” was a blues shuffle, the second a slow blues titled “All Night Long” that featured B.B. King-style guitar by Thomas Hartwell. In fact Specialty owner Art Rupe happened to be looking for a singer like B.B. King, although staff producer Bumps Blackwell recalls Rupe as seeking the next Ray Charles. The demos didn’t overwhelm Rupe, but he signed Little Richard anyway.

Blackwell was assigned to record Richard in New Orleans, and the resulting session featuring pianist Huey Smith and saxophonist Lee Diamond begat eight standard-issue blues/R&B songs. Then, during a break on the second day while Smith was out, the producer heard Richard sing “Tutti Frutti,” accompanying himself on the piano. With only 15 minutes of studio time remaining, and the original lyrics cleaned up by songwriter and studio habitué Dorothy LaBostrie, there was no time for Smith to learn the piano part, so Richard played it himself.

According to Hildebrand, “Richard attacked the piano with incessant even-eight-note patters which was decidedly different from the shuffle rhythm drummer Earl Palmer was laying down behind him. Swing and shuffle beats had been the primary pulse of rhythm & blues until Richard introduced even eights that would come to drive most R&B and rock music and still do today.”

 
The song shot to #2 on Billboard’s R&B charts and a creditable #17 pop. Rolling Stone rated it at #43 on its list of Greatest 500 Songs of All Time. Subsequent Little Richard Specialty hits dented Top 10 R&B and Top 20 pop. All the songs on Here’s Little Richard were recorded in New Orleans with the exception of “True, Fine Mama” and “She’s Got It,” both made in Los Angeles, Specialty’s home.


Since abruptly giving up show business for God in October 1957, Richard’s life has vacillated between religion and rock ’n’ roll. Today at age 78, he lives in Nashville. Despite being wheelchair-bound, on July 3, 2011, he performed “Tutti Frutti” and other hits on the nationally televised all-star “A Capitol Fourth” on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Two New Southern Books Worthy of Your Attention This Holiday Season

18 Dec

THE STORY OF THE NU WAY

by Ed Grisamore (Mercer University Press)

We dined at the Nu-Way a few years back. This is truly one of the South’s most iconic eateries. I have always loved the look of their historic neon sign, yet I knew very little about this hot dog stand’s history. Pick up a copy of this new book and expand your knowledge — we think you’ll dig their dog. They may have spelling issues, but they have the whole hot dog thing down to a science.

For almost seventy-five years, one of Macon’s most famous eating establishments, Nu-Way, has intentionally misspelled the word W-E-I-N-E-R on its marquee. Thanks to a sign-maker misplacing those vowels in 1937, the restaurant has had a conversation piece on the plate along with its legendary hot dogs. James Mallis immigrated to Macon from Greece and opened the city’s first fast-food restaurant on historic Cotton Avenue in 1916. Nu-Way is now the second-oldest hot dog stand in America, just a month shy of Nathan’s on Coney Island in New York.

In his eighth book, There Is More than One Way to Spell Wiener, Macon newspaper columnist Ed Grisamore tells the amazing story of how Nu-Way has become a cultural and culinary icon. Nu-Way is part of the fabric of Macon, Georgia. Nearly everyone in town has a Nu-Way story. When people move away, Nu-Way is one of the first places they visit when they come back home. One woman drove almost 500 miles and ordered 150 to go. But it’s not just about the food. It’s nostalgic. It’s a melting pot of Macon. To go downtown for a hot dog at noon is to see the common denominator of businessmen in three-piece suits sharing the same lunch counter with blue-collar workers and street people.

The book covers the generations of Macon families that have worked at Nu-Way, captures the passion of its loyal customers and tells the story of how the Norman Rockwell-like logo was painted by a former Macon fire chief. Even Oprah Winfrey dropped by for a chili dog and a Diet Coke on a visit to Macon in 2007 . Grisamore has been known to satisfy his cravings for slaw dogs (voted No. 1 in the nation by The New York Times) several times each week.

www.mupress.org

THE GORILLA MAN & THE EMPRESS OF STEAK

by Randy Fertel (University Press of Mississippi) 

The name Ruth’s Chris Steak House was always something of an oddity to me. Who was this Ruth? Who was Chris? Exactly how did this unusual name come about? Sure, their steaks were really good. And yes, the brand is well known throughout the world. But who knew there was such an interesting and colorful back story? Their saga is fascinating and provides a rare glimpse into the culture and restaurant industry of old New Orleans. You’re familiar with their steaks, so now take some time and learn more about the characters who created the sizzle.  

The Gorilla Man and the Empress of Steak is the story of two larger-than-life characters and the son whom their lives helped to shape. Ruth Fertel was a petite, smart, tough-as-nails blonde with a weakness for rogues, who founded the Ruth’s Chris Steak House empire almost by accident. Rodney Fertel was a gold-plated, one-of-a-kind personality, a railbird-heir to wealth from a pawnshop of dubious repute just around the corner from where the teenage Louis Armstrong and his trumpet were discovered. When Fertel ran for mayor of New Orleans on a single campaign promise–buying a pair of gorillas for the zoo– he garnered a paltry 308 votes. Then he purchased the gorillas anyway!

These colorful figures yoked together two worlds not often connected–lazy rice farms in the bayous and swinging urban streets where ethnicities jazzily collided. A trip downriver to the hamlet of Happy Jack focuses on its French-Alsatian roots, bountiful tables, and self-reliant lifestyle that inspired a restaurant legend. The story also offers a close-up of life in the Old Jewish Quarter on Rampart Street–and how it intersected with the denizens of “Back a’ Town,” just a few blocks away, who brought jazz from New Orleans to the world.

The Gorilla Man and the Empress of Steak is a New Orleans story, featuring the distinctive characters, color, food, and history of that city–before Hurricane Katrina and after. But it also is the universal story of family and the full magnitude of outsize follies leavened with equal measures of humor, rage, and rue.

Randy Fertel, New Orleans, Louisiana, and New York, New York, is a writer and president of both the Fertel Foundation and the Ruth U. Fertel Foundation. He has taught English at Harvard, Tulane, LeMoyne College, the University of New Orleans, and the New School for Social Research.

www.upress.state.ms.us 

Espy’s Fabulous Tomato Chutney from Tybee Island, Georgia

29 May

Savannah Food Writer Damon Lee Fowler tipped us to this wonderful product. We receive sample products all the time and rarely do they leave such a lasting impression on us. A chef (Espy Geissler) in Tybee Island, GA created this magical pairing of sweet and spicy (jalapenos!).

I have long been a chutney lover. And I am not easily impressed. But this product will totally knock your socks off. Yes, it is that good. Trust me. However, you may find it difficult to acquire if you (like most of us) live outside the greater Savannah area. Thankfully, Espy’s has a Facebook page — I have provided a link to that page at the bottom of this review. So go get you some. I have never been so confident that you will love a product.

*It makes a sublime compliment to fried green tomatoes & meat loaf.

Espy’s Tomato Chutney – Tybee Island, GA

chefespy@bellsouth.net – For direct orders

 http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Espys-Tybee-Island-Tomato-Chutney/220445967971293 

Shrek Peddles Vidalias to 50% Growth Spurt

3 Jul

http://www.vidaliaonion.org/

Weaver D’s is Still “Automatic for the People”

10 Jun

Ray Charles’ “Genius + Soul = Jazz” Just Got Better

30 Mar

Ray Charles LP “Genius + Soul = Jazz” has been a mainstay in my personal wax collection for quite some time now. You might say it’s the missing link between the Count Basie Orchestra and Booker T. and the MGs. The recording features a face-melting horn section and a greasy down home feel that hints towards a Memphis vibe that had not yet been created.  Brother Ray’s groovy take on The Clovers’ “One Mint Julep” is alone worth the price of admission. The original CD release upped the anty by including the “My Kind of Jazz” LP, which carried on in a similar winning vein.

Now Concord Records new 2-CD expanded edition captures an amazing total of 37 tracks — and there’s not a clunker in the bunch!  The additional tracks come from the “Jazz Number II” and “My Kind of Jazz Part 3″ collections. Those final 17 songs (including bonus track “Misty”) spotlight Charles’ work as  a producer and the Basie influence is agan very evident. The arrangements swing and the shear power of the brass will blow you away. I didn’t think this CD collection could get any better, but it obviously has.  Buy it now and swing along with Ray.       

Ray Charles was best known for his work in the idioms of R&B, rock ‘n’ roll and even successful forays into country. But he also recorded influential jazz albums, including the groundbreaking Genius + Soul = Jazz originally released in 1961, and continuing into the ’70s with My Kind of Jazz, Jazz Number II and My Kind of Jazz Part 3. Concord Records will release a deluxe edition two-CD set featuring digitally remastered versions of all four albums including encyclopedic liner notes by Will Friedwald, jazz writer for The Wall Street Journal and author of several books on music and popular culture, along with original liner notes by Dick Katz and Quincy Jones.

Genius + Soul = Jazz was recorded at the Van Gelder Studios in Englewood Cliffs, NJ, in late 1960. The producer was Creed Taylor; arrangers, Quincy Jones and Ralph Burns. Ray Charles played the organ with three vocals (“I’ve Got News for You,” “I’m Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town” and “One Mint Julep”) and band members included members of the Count Basie Orchestra: Thad Jones, Joe Newman, Billy Mitchell, Frank Wess, Freddie Green, and Sonny Payne among others. Issued originally on ABC Records’ legendary Impulse jazz label, the record ascended to the #4 spot on Billboard’s pop album chart, and spawned the very first singles on Impulse, heretofore an album label. “I’ve Got News for You,” rose to #8 R&B and #66 on the Hot 100. In addition, Charles’ version of “One Mint Julep” charted #1 R&B and #8 pop, and his rendition of the blues standard “I’m Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town” reached #25 R&B and #84 pop.

As annotator Friedwald states, “Genius + Soul = Jazz . . . was a bold and innovative album, but, at the same time, a direct step forward from his earlier work.” Although Basie himself does not appear on the album, the Count was a major model as Charles assembled a full-scale, working orchestra. Basie also influenced his use of organ in a jazz context, and Charles was happy to record at the Van Gelder studio, where Jimmy Smith had recorded his classic Blue Note albums. Truly, as Dick Katz wrote in his original January 1961 liner notes, “The combination here of rare talent plus uncommon craftsmanship has produced a record that showcases the timeless quality and innate taste that is uniquely that of Ray Charles.”

Some nine years later, Charles recorded another jazz album, My Kind of Jazz. With sessions in Los Angeles this time, Charles surrounded himself with such players as Bobby Bryant and Blue Mitchell, trumpet; Glen Childress, trombone; Andy Ennis, Albert McQueen and Clifford Scott, saxophone; and Ben Martin, guitar. The album contained Charles’ own “Booty-Butt” (which was issued as a single on his own Tangerine label), Lee Morgan’s “Sidewinder,” and Horace Silver’s “Señor Blues.”

In his original liner notes to My Kind of Jazz, Quincy Jones wrote, “This album is the essence of what Ray used to tell us when we were kids: Be true to the soul of the material you’re dealing with.”

Jazz Number II was recorded roughly two years later at Charles’ Tangerine/RPM Studios and issued on Tangerine Records. Charles enlisted an impressive cast of arrangers: Alf Clausen, Teddy Edwards, Jimmy Heath and Roger Neumann. The tracks included Ray Charles and Roger Neumann’s “Our Suite,” Teddy Edwards’ “Brazilian Skies” and “Going Home,” Thad Jones’ “Kids Are Pretty People” and Jimmy Heath’s “Togetherness.”

Finally, My Kind of Jazz Part 3, which concludes the Genius + Soul = Jazz deluxe package, was recorded in Los Angeles circa 1975, featured the Ray Charles Orchestra including Clifford Solomon, alto sax; Glen Childress, trombone; Johnny Coles, trumpet; Leroy Cooper, baritone sax; and James Clay, tenor sax. Included are compositions by Duke Ellington, Horace Silver, Jimmy Heath and Benny Golson. Issued on Charles’ own Crossover Records, the album reached #55 on the R&B chart in 1976.

The reissue of Genius + Soul = Jazz continues Concord Music Group’s long-term reissuing of the Ray Charles catalog in cooperation with the Ray Charles Foundation. Among the other albums repackaged in the past year are Genius Hits the Road, Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music, Message From the People, plus the career compilation titled Genius.

Southern Soul BBQ Goes Up in Flames

29 Mar

Heartbreaking news from the Georgia Lowcountry …

Here’s hoping they rise from the ashes soon!

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