Tag Archives: Phil Spector

Sweet Dreams, Estelle Bennett

14 Feb

NEW YORK – Estelle Bennett, one of the Ronettes, the singing trio whose 1963 hit “Be My Baby” epitomized the famed “wall of sound” technique of its producer, Phil Spector, has died at her home in Englewood, N.J. She was 67.

Bennett’s brother-in-law, Jonathan Greenfield, said police found her dead in her apartment on Wednesday after relatives had been unable to contact her. The time and cause of death have not yet been determined. Greenfield is the manager and husband of Bennett’s sister, Ronettes lead singer Ronnie Spector.

The Ronettes were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2007; its Web site hails the group as “the premier act of the girl group era.” Among their admirers were the Beatles and the Rolling Stones; their exotic hairstyles and makeup are aped by Amy Winehouse.

The Ronettes — sisters Veronica “Ronnie” and Estelle Bennett and their cousin Nedra Talley — signed with Spector’s Philles Records in 1963.

Their recording of “Be My Baby” hit No. 2 on Billboard magazine’s pop music chart that year. Among their other hits were “Walkin’ in the Rain” and “Baby I Love You.”

They also did a memorable version of “Sleigh Ride” that appeared on Spector’s “A Christmas Gift for You” album. Their last Philles single was “I Can Hear Music” in 1966.

The songs feature Spector’s elaborate arrangements that blend many instruments into a smooth, pulsating “wall.”

“They could sing all their way right through a wall of sound,” Keith Richards of the Stones said as the Ronettes were inducted into the rock hall. “They didn’t need anything. They touched my heart right there and then and they touch it still.”

But their string of hits had tailed off by the time they split around 1967.

Ronnie Bennett had married Spector in 1968 but they divorced six years later.

Greenfield said Ronnie Spector was devastated over her sister’s death.

“Estelle was Ronnie’s sidekick in the Ronettes,” Greenfield, of Newbury, Conn., said Thursday from New York. “She was very much into fashion and worked with Ronnie on the whole look and style of the Ronettes.”

After the group’s breakup, Bennett rarely made public appearances.

For nearly 15 years, the women waged a lengthy, and ultimately unsuccessful, court battle with Spector over royalties.

They sued Spector in the late 1980s, saying he had cheated them out of royalties by using their music in ways not authorized by the their recording contract. For example, “Be My Baby” was played in the opening credits of the smash 1987 movie “Dirty Dancing.”

A trial was held in 1998, and in 2000, the judge ordered Spector to pay $2.6 million in past royalties and interest for the use of Ronettes songs as background music in movies, videocassette recordings, and advertising.

But New York State’s highest court threw out that ruling on appeal in 2002. The judges noted that the contract did not actually mention secondary rights to the use of music, so-called “synchronization rights,” which are a more modern phenomenon in the entertainment industry. But under New York state contract law, the court said, the singers did not control those rights unless their contract specifically said they did.

At the group’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction in 2007, Ronnie Spector did not mention her ex-husband, but he sent a note that was read at the ceremony saying, “I wish them all the happiness and good fortune the world has to offer.”

In recent years, Phil Spector has been battling criminal charges in the shooting death of actress Lana Clarkson.

Bennett was born in 1941, her sister in 1943 and Talley in 1945, according to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Web site.

According to the book “He’s a Rebel,” a biography of Phil Spector by Mark Ribowsky, the Ronettes first began performing as the Darling Sisters and later worked as dancers at New York’s Peppermint Lounge, the epicenter of the early 1960s dance craze, the Twist.

Their first recording contract, with Colpix, went nowhere, but then they were signed by Spector.

In addition to her sister, Bennett is survived by a daughter, Toyin Hunter of Santa Monica, Calif., and three grandsons.

The angels are now singing sweeter than ever!

More Holiday Cheer from Phil Spector

30 Nov

Here is part 2 of a holiday tribute to svengali Phil Spector —

Hope this helps you get into the Christmas Spirit!

Time for Christmas Tunes!

14 Nov

I just re-activated all the Christmas songs on my ITunes jukebox.

Perhaps my favorite of all Christmas albums is Phil Spector’s “A Christmas Gift for You.” Yes, Spector is actually Jewish, but unlike Neil Diamond & Babs Streisand, he manages to pull it off. It doesn’t hurt to have a killer house band and the angelic voices of Darlene Love & Ronnie Spector.

Enjoy — and let me be the first to wish you a very Merry Christmas!

The Wrecking Crew

20 Sep

This is the trailer for the Wrecking Crew film — featuring the late Earl Palmer.

R.I.P. Earl Palmer

20 Sep

Earl Palmer provided the backbeat for many rock n’ roll classics

LOS ANGELES – Earl Palmer, the session drummer whose pioneering backbeats were recorded on such classics as Little Richard‘s “Tutti Frutti” and The Righteous Brothers‘ “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin‘,” has died. He was 84.

Palmer died Friday at his Los Angeles home after fighting a lengthy illness, his spokesman Kevin Sasaki said. Born in New Orleans in 1924 and later moving to Los Angeles, Palmer worked extensively in both cities, recording with some of the music world’s all-time greats on thousands of tracks.

His beats form the backdrop on Ike and Tina Turner’s “River Deep, Mountain High,” Fats Domino’s “The Fat Man” and “I Hear You Knockin’” by Smiley Lewis. From his Los Angeles home, Palmer drummed for music producer Phil Spector and Motown, and his session credits include artists as diverse as the Monkees, Neil Young and Frank Sinatra.

“He was groundbreaking,” said Ed Vodika, the pianist in the Earl Palmer Trio. Palmer “shaped American music for the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s.” Vodika said he met Palmer about 10 years ago and was asked to join the trio. The pianist said he spent the next five years playing weekly gigs in Los Angeles that attracted a host of big-name musicians, from Bonnie Raitt to Ringo Starr.

“He worked with so many people in his career … you never knew who would be in the audience,” Vodika said. Palmer was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000. According to the institution’s Web site, Little Richard wrote in his autobiography that Palmer “is probably the greatest session drummer of all time.”

Palmer married four times and is survived by his seven children.

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