Tag Archives: Recipes

UGA Press publishes “The Southern Foodways Alliance Community Cookbook”

5 Oct

The Southern Foodways Alliance Community Cookbook

Edited by Sara Roahen and John T. Edge
Foreword by Alton Brown

“Local recipes from the worldly South”

“Each page herein delivers a strong sense of community; the contributions are from real people with real names; the collection is democratic, but with nary a sign of culinary chaos; and the food is just plain good. And here’s the best part, as far as I’m concerned: Regardless of whether it looks back into the past or ahead into the future, this book looks ever Southward.”
—Alton Brown, from the foreword

Everybody has one in their collection. You know—one of those old, spiral- or plastic-tooth-bound cookbooks sold to support a high school marching band, a church, or the local chapter of the Junior League. These recipe collections reflect, with unimpeachable authenticity, the dishes that define communities: chicken and dumplings, macaroni and cheese, chess pie. When the Southern Foodways Alliance began curating a cookbook, it was to these spiral-bound, sauce-splattered pages that they turned for their model.

Including more than 170 tested recipes, this cookbook is a true reflection of southern foodways and the people, regardless of residence or birthplace, who claim this food as their own. Traditional and adapted, fancy and unapologetically plain, these recipes are powerful expressions of collective identity. There is something from—and something for—everyone. The recipes and the stories that accompany them came from academics, writers, catfish farmers, ham curers, attorneys, toqued chefs, and people who just like to cook—spiritual Southerners of myriad ethnicities, origins, and culinary skill levels.

Edited by Sara Roahen and John T. Edge, written, collaboratively, by Sheri Castle, Timothy C. Davis, April McGreger, Angie Mosier, and Fred Sauceman, the book is divided into chapters that represent the region’s iconic foods: Gravy, Garden Goods, Roots, Greens, Rice, Grist, Yardbird, Pig, The Hook, The Hunt, Put Up, and Cane. Therein you’ll find recipes for pimento cheese, country ham with redeye gravy, tomato pie, oyster stew, gumbo z’herbes, and apple stack cake. You’ll learn traditional ways of preserving green beans, and you’ll come to love refried black-eyed peas.

Are you hungry yet? Place your order now!

http://www.amazon.com/Southern-Foodways-Alliance-Community-Cookbook/dp/0820332755

These Cookbooks Make Great Holiday Gifts

9 Dec

From Publishers Weekly

The playful title of this Southern-French cookbook belies its studious attitude to cookery. Virginia Mollie Cox Willis, a chef who has cooked for the White House and stars like Aretha Franklin and Jane Fonda, grew up in Georgia and Louisiana, absorbing her mother’s and grandmother’s repertoire of grits, casseroles and gumbos before developing her professional skills at French cooking academies. The result is a hybrid cuisine she calls refined Southern, which applies traditional French technique and lighter ingredients to produce new versions of Southern staples. Her collard greens are cooked up with smoked salt instead of hog jowl; her cornbread is dressed with panko. Sprinkled liberally throughout are the Southern ingredients that Willis was raised on: Vidalia onions, okra, Georgia pecans and peaches. Willis’s approach is faithful, yet she’s unafraid to reinvent culinary clichés when necessary—like making pimiento cheese from scratch. Some of her creations—like a tipsy salad, riffing on the frat boy combo of watermelon and vodka; Yukon Gold and Edamame Mash; and Coca-Cola Glazed Baby Back Ribs—elevate mundane flavors with sheer ingenuity. Magnificent color photos; detailed, helpful tips; and Willis’s cheerful, trustworthy guidance make this an original and welcome newcomer to a classic cookbook library.

From Publishers Weekly

Writer and poet Bryan follows up 2006′s Mrs. Rowe’s Restaurant Cookbook by zeroing in on the Virginia establishment’s highly lauded desserts. Bryan’s compilation of 65 recipes hits all the sweet spots, offering reliable standards like peach, blueberry, coconut cream and sweet potato pies, as well as caramel coconut, german chocolate and watermelon variations. Though most of the recipes are basic, achieving the perfect crust isn’t; Bryan offers patient tutelage and step-by-step photos, but acknowledges that Mrs. Rowe’s technique took years to master. Even experienced pie makers should pick up a trick or two; Virginia’s Almost Impossible Coconut Pie, for instance, has no crust-the custard filling creates a firm outer layer when baked. Those looking to tweak their crust might want to consider cream cheese, which makes a tangier product than butter and flour alone. Bakers stymied by weeping meringues, meanwhile, will be comforted by the restaurant’s “weepless” version, bolstered with salt and cornstarch. Seasoned pie pros and newbies will both find this ode to southern desserts a helpful and lasting resource.

Andouille & Beef Burgers Recipe

21 Aug

andouille

Saw this one on Saveur’s web site. Looks absolutely killer!

Spicy mayonnaise

  • 3/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon Cajun or Creole seasoning blend
  • 1/4 teaspoon hot pepper sauce

Burgers

  • 1/2 pound andouille sausage, cut into scant 1/4-inch cubes
  • 3/4 cup pecans, toasted, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 1/2 pounds ground beef chuck or ground beef (20 percent fat)

Caramelized onions

  • 1 1/2 pounds onions, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil plus more for brushing grill rack
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon golden brown sugar

 

  • 6 large hamburger buns, split
  • 8 ounces crumbled blue cheese

 

  • 12 pickled okra pods, halved lengthwise*
  • 3 cups watercress tops
Preparation

For mayonnaise:
Mix all ingredients in small bowl. Cover and chill.

Do ahead: Can be made 2 days ahead. Keep chilled.

For burgers:
Toss first 4 ingredients in large bowl. Add beef; blend gently. Shape mixture into six 1/2-inch-thick patties. Transfer patties to small baking sheet.

Do ahead: Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.

For onions:
Prepare barbecue (medium-high heat). Toss onions and next 3 ingredients in large skillet. Place skillet on grill; cook until onions are golden, stirring often, about 25 minutes. Remove from grill; season with salt and pepper.

Brush grill rack with olive oil. Grill buns, cut side down, until golden, about 2 minutes. Transfer buns to work surface. Grill burgers until brown on bottom, about 3 minutes. Turn over; sprinkle with cheese. Grill until burgers are cooked to desired doneness, about 3 minutes for medium. Place some onions, then burger, on each bun bottom. Top each with okra and watercress. Spread mayonnaise on cut side of bun tops; place on burgers. Serve with remaining mayonnaise.

*Shopping tip: Look for pickled okra where the pickles and relishes are displayed.

“The Surprising Story of Milk”

13 Jan

milk

I just received (today, in fact) a review copy of this book from our friends at Knopf Publishing. Can’t wait to explore this one. Like many of you, milk was the first food I ever tasted on this planet, so I’m kind of partial to this subject matter.

I plucked the synopsis found below from Amazon.com:

Product Description
Part cookbook—with more than 120 enticing recipes—part culinary history, part inquiry into the evolution of an industry, Milk is a one-of-a-kind book that will forever change the way we think about dairy products.

Anne Mendelson, author of Stand Facing the Stove, first explores the earliest Old World homes of yogurt and kindred fermented products made primarily from sheep’s and goats’ milk and soured as a natural consequence of climate. Out of this ancient heritage from lands that include Greece, Bosnia, Turkey, Israel, Persia, Afghanistan, and India, she mines a rich source of culinary traditions.

Mendelson then takes us on a journey through the lands that traditionally only consumed milk fresh from the cow—what she calls the Northwestern Cow Belt (northern Europe, Great Britain, North America). She shows us how milk reached such prominence in our diet in the nineteenth century that it led to the current practice of overbreeding cows and overprocessing dairy products. Her lucid explanation of the chemical intricacies of milk and the simple home experiments she encourages us to try are a revelation of how pure milk products should really taste.

The delightfully wide-ranging recipes that follow are grouped according to the main dairy ingredient: fresh milk and cream, yogurt, cultured milk and cream, butter and true buttermilk, fresh cheeses. We learn how to make luscious Clotted Cream, magical Lemon Curd, that beautiful quasi-cheese Mascarpone, as well as homemade yogurt, sour cream, true buttermilk, and homemade butter. She gives us comfort foods such as Milk Toast and Cream of Tomato Soup alongside Panir and Chhenna from India. Here, too, are old favorites like Herring with Sour Cream Sauce, Beef Stroganoff, a New Englandish Clam Chowder, and the elegant Russian Easter dessert, Paskha. And there are drinks for every season, from Turkish Ayran and Indian Lassis to Batidos (Latin American milkshakes) and an authentic hot chocolate.

This illuminating book will be an essential part of any food lover’s collection and is bound to win converts determined to restore the purity of flavor to our First Food.

More later … now where’s that tall glass of milk!

Explore these Two Worthwhile Southern Books

9 Oct

The restaurant’s second cookbook is an invitation into a family experience. Anthony and Gail’s son, John, shares his parents’ lives through recipes, anecdotes, photos, and letters of support they received after Hurricane Katrina.

In business for more than eighty years, Uglesich’s began as a po-boy shop in 1924. The lunch counter was handed down to a second generation, Anthony Uglesich, son of the Yugoslavian founder. Anthony added a new chef, his wife Gail, and new recipes, excluding the luxuries of coffee and dessert. Their devoted patrons enjoyed a menu consisting mostly of seafood dishes.

Beginning with an egg sandwich for five cents, the restaurant has since taken on a life of its own. It closed on weekends and for summer vacation while the owners experimented at home or took a break. It didn’t accept reservations or credit cards. Far from being the typical sleepy, small-time mom-and-pop, the restaurant and everyone in it moved nonstop from open to close, and it gained a national reputation.

The restaurant belonged to the family that shares its name, but it also belonged to the customers, consisting mostly of regulars and some frequent tourists who formed lines around the block to get in. Other guests have included Emeril Lagasse and Martha Stewart, who both featured the restaurant on their respective television programs. Newcomers may have been put off by the small size (only ten tables), or the exterior, desperately in need of new paint, but that didn’t stop the limos from pulling up outside.

http://www.pelicanpub.com/Press_Release.asp?passval=9781589805514&title=COOKING%20WITH%20THE%20UGLESICHES

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HISTORIC CHURCHES OF MISSISSIPPI

Historic Churches of Mississippi is Sherry Pace’s photographic tribute to religious architecture in Mississippi. In her new book she showcases 133 of the state’s most notable historic churches and synagogues dating from the 1820s through the 1920s. Close-ups of some of the structures reveal the work of talented artisans and beautiful architectural detailing.

Architectural historian Richard J. Cawthon provides historic and architectural background both in the introductory essay and in the captions to Pace’s photographs. The religious styles and forms represented range from simple wood-frame country churches to elaborate cathedrals, including the Federal, Gothic Revival, Greek Revival, Italianate, Romanesque, Moorish, and Neoclassical Revival styles.

All of the churches are documented by the Historic Preservation Division of the Department of Archives and History. The book includes images of several churches that have since been destroyed or damaged by Hurricane Katrina. On the front cover of the catalog is the bell tower of the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer in Biloxi. Made a memorial after surviving Hurricane Camille in 1969, it was destroyed during Katrina.

With churches from Aberdeen, Bay St. Louis, Biloxi, Bogue Chitto, Brookhaven, Byhalia, Canton, Carrollton, Centreville, Church Hill, Clarksdale, Clinton, Columbus, Como, Enterprise, Greenville, Greenwood, Grenada, Gulfport, Hattiesburg, Hazlehurst, Holly Springs, Iuka, Jackson, Laurel, Leakesville, Learned, Leland, Lexington, Liberty, Macon, Madison, Magnolia, McComb, Meridian, Natchez, New Albany, Ocean Springs, Okolona, Oxford, Pocahontas, Pontotoc, Port Gibson, Raymond, Rodney, Sardis, Shubuta, Starkville, Terry, Vaiden, Vicksburg, Water Valley, Wesson, Winona, Woodville, and Yazoo City

Sherry Pace of Madison County, Mississippi, is a freelance outdoor photographer. Her work has appeared in the Best of Photography Annual 2001 and Victorian Houses of Mississippi. Learn more about her work at http://www.sherrypacephotography.com. Richard J. Cawthon is the former chief architectural historian at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. He lives in Jackson, Mississippi.

http://www.upress.state.ms.us/books/875

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